Skip to main content

Fill In The Blank - Exhibit for ArtEAST

Paper mache' box supplied by ArtEAST



As a member of ArtEast (a fabulous gallery and organization, by the way!), I was asked to participate in their "Fill In The Blank" exhibit.  Where the members (both artists and non-artists), were given  7"x7"x3" paper mache' boxes, and told "Your charge is to fill in this blank box in such a way as to represent yourself, spark conversation and inspire someone to declare ""You've got some explaining to do!"".



Here's the blank box on my table (definitely needing filling!)









1/4 sunflower


It sounded like a fun project, so of course I signed up!  But then I had to find something to fill it with.
I didn't have time to create a new piece of artwork for it... but perhaps I already had something I could use!  As luck would have it, I had just taken apart a painting.  It was a 1/4 flower-face from an attempt to make a whole, interchangeable art piece... but I didn't execute it well and wasn't happy with the results.  I took it apart to experiment with silk that had been permeated with matte medium (which is how I normally get my paintings to adhere to canvas).  It was flexible, but not soft and silky.
But it was perfect for the box!!




Some of the items,
I thought about incorporating
The box with the main
panel mounted, and edges
painted green


So I began to cut it up to fit the inside of the box.
I painted the edges and corners of the box a soft green to match the tone of the green in the painting.  Then I began to glue in my pieces, and play with what else to fill the box with??




I paint on silk with dyes, so I needed a nod to that. I'm a crafter/maker too (and can't seem to escape that!), so I wanted a nod to that as well.   I have a HUGE button .. collection (addiction?) and wanted to use some of them.  And I have sold a lot of upcycled items including my most popular world-globe-based items - so I needed a nod to that as well.

 Once I'd mounted the silk painting on the inside, and put scrap silks on the outside of the box.  I began to try figure out the layout for the rest of the items.
 

a small world globe in the
form of a pencil sharpener



As the owner of Re-Covered Treasures, I have made and sold MANY world globe lampshades and world globe bowls. I found this nifty world globe pencil sharpener and thought it would be perfect in size and scale, to use in my box.
 






So I made this tiny globe into into those a pendant lamp & shade, and a bowl.

Mini world globe lamp
Mini world globe bowl
(with floral arrangement)

The bowls are typically used for holding floral arrangements so I made a little arrangement out of silk flowers which I painted with a touch of dye. 

And the lampshade - I used a strip of silk which I pulled threads from until it looked like fringe. Then added a wire and a lightbulb (from an xmas light!), and then wired it right into the box - to hang like a pendant fixture! 


A few
silk tools



Then I chose a few silk tools (specifically a paintbrush, an eye-dropper, and a needle-tip applicator bottle).  I even added a small chunk of loose/soft silk which has dyes on it - so people can see (and potentially feel) the way the silk really is before it's mounted.
Button art

I went through my vast array of buttons (oh say, 60lbs of buttons thanks to Ebay!) and found some that were of a similar color scheme.  And I found 1 funky 60's pin in an orange-swirl pattern to use.  Now to create a little bit of button-art.




I had one last thing to add to complete my box ... the labels that I wear (figuratively, most of the time) daily.  Those I added, scattered around - because that's how I end up wearing them... randomly, often overlapping.

Here is my finished box.   It's box #38 - and I hope you stop by ArtEAST to see all of the fabulous boxes that have been created!!
My finished box for Fill In The Blank - at ArtEAST

Right side
Left side




















Comments

Popular posts from this blog

So You Want To Make Your Own Vertical Stovepipe Steamer?

I wrote a post on my other blog several years ago, but was just asked to create a new document for the Silk Painters group on Facebook.  So I thought I'd share it here!

Making your own Stovepipe Steamer is relatively easy to do and certainly cost effective!  To buy one new (and made specifically for silk paintings) will easily cost you over $1000 bucks.... but making one yourself can cost under $100 (mine was less than $50!).

I've had several people ask: Why do you want a Stovepipe Steamer?  Can't you just use a pot and steaming basket on your stove?
Both are good questions!
Yes you can use a pot and steaming basket on your stove.  But I personally, don't care for the idea of the chemicals/dyes/etc being in my kitchen. They are NOT good eats (to borrow from Alton Brown). Plus if you use a steaming basket in a pot, you have to constantly watch the water levels.  And you don't have a lot of space, which means you're probably only steaming 1 item at a time.  And …

So you're thinking of making your own World Globe Bowl or Lampshade?

So you're thinking of making your own World Globe Bowl or Lampshade? (a series of 3 tutorial posts explaining how to select a World Globe, make a lampshade, and make a bowl).


Derwent Academy Online Classes - a fun (and rewarding!) opportunity!

I don't know if you've had a chance to look at Derwent Academy's website - but it is chock-a-block full of information!

Derwent is a company located in the United Kingdom (Great Britain to exact!).  They make WONDERFUL fine-art pencils including: sketching pencils, sketch-wash pencils, colored pencils, watercolor pencils, Inktense pencils (which are a special kind of watercolor pencil), and a variety of other items.

I recently found out that Derwent has an online academy - and that they have a rather fabulous offer
for anyone who's interested in learning more about drawing/art skills.  They currently offer a 6-lesson class to anyone who is interested.  If you complete all 6 lessons successfully, they will send you a 18-piece set of their wonderful pencils!  GOTTA LOVE THAT!!

All that is required is that you follow the general directions given (and they usually give you a choice of what or how to draw).  And that you submit a photo or scanned-image of your work to them f…